Teaching and Learning Symposium

Session Schedule

 

Monday, May 7

9:00 – 9:30 a.m. Welcome Coffee & Network Bosa Lobby


9:30 a.m. Opening Speech Welcome from Administration and Symposium Chairs
Keynote: Pat Duncan, Superintendent of Learning – BC Ministry of Education
Continuing on the Journey of Transforming Education in BC-The Graduation Program – British Columbia’s education system is in the midst of change as it prepares our students for a rapidly changing world. Intensive work has been done to redesign the curriculum to include more variation, flexibility and real-life experiences to better prepare students for the future. The core goal underlying the planned curriculum, assessment and graduation requirements is to help students succeed and thrive in a world that is changing rapidly and radically. Bosa Theater


10:45 – 11:45 a.m. Be the Change – How to Indigenize Your Classroom 
Judy Snaydon & David Geary LB 322
Where is Cap U at in terms of the 94 Calls to Action in the 2015 Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada? How can we continue to indigenize our curriculum and each day make acts of reconciliation in our teaching and learning practice? Judy Snaydon and David Geary will share one act of collaboration between IIDF and IDEA students as an exa.m.ple, then facilitate a workshop on ways to indigenize your classroom.


12:00 – 1:30 p.m. Lunch


1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Come Get your Moodle on!
Susan Mangan, IT Services LB306
In this presentation we will introduce you to Moodle 3.3 which will be available May 1. Learn about new features, what has changed and come prepared to participate in a Q&A session as we answer your most burning Moodle questions!


1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Mysteries of Capilano
New Faculty session LB 322
An “unconference“ style session for new faculty who have been at Capilano for five years or less.  An opportunity to ask questions and find answers about any aspect of teaching and working at Capilano.


2:45 – 3:45 p.m. Using Your Body to Lead: a Conducting Lesson
Lars Kaario LB 306
Unleash your inner maestro with Lars Kaario, our award winning conductor. He’ll share how he uses body language to lead a choir in this highly interactive session.


2:45 – 3:45 p.m. Privilege Walk
David Geary & Ki Wight LB 322
Privilege is being born on third base and thinking you hit a triple. Or is it? Join David Geary and Ki Wight as they take us through the Privilege Walk they’re integrating into classes with documentary, acting, film and teaching students. They consider it an exercise in raising awareness and empathy for others within the class, but also a chance to transform an instructor’s relationship to their students. You can see an examples of the walk on the Buzzfeed video: What is Privilege? and in the Peacelearner Lesson Plan.  Although some find it provocative and powerful, others consider it dangerous. We’d love to know what you think. Come join in the experiment. Give us feedback to make it better, and possibly find a new tool for your teaching kit. Take a walk with us.

Tuesday, May 8

9:30 – 10:30 a.m. What We Talk About When We Talk About EPortfolios
The Portfolio Project Team LB321
What can ePortfolio initiatives offer higher education? This session will provide an update on Capilano University’s Portfolio Project and an overview of current research and best practices informing course- and program-level portfolios initiatives in post-secondary education with a particular on the readings and conversations that informed the meetings of the Folio Thinking Campus Learning Community and Spring 2018 ePortfolio Development Community this past academic year.


9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Introducing Video and Web Conferencing, WebEx Part I
Alan Hovden, Teodora Dotzeva IT Services LB316
In this hands-on introductory workshop we will explore and demystify the WebEx web conferencing technology available for you to support distance learners or even for office hours. You will learn through experience as you join in collaborative activities using the desktop sharing, whiteboard, chat, poll and recording features. If you do not have a WebEx account please contact Alan Hovden before participating in the session. ahovden@capilanou.ca


10:30 – 11:30 p.m. Come Get your Moodle on!
Susan Mangan, IT Services LB306
In this presentation we will introduce you to Moodle 3.3 which will be available May 1. Learn about new features, what has changed and come prepared to participate in a Q&A session as we answer your most burning Moodle questions!


10:45 – 11:45 a.m. FOLIO THINKING/RETHINKING TEACHING
Portfolio Project Team Roundtable LB321
In Spring 2017, Capilano’s first-ever ePortfolio Development Community – with ten instructors from three Faculties and two campuses – undertook a term-long curriculum redesign project to embed folio thinking and digital portfolios into eight courses. The redesigned courses were delivered for the first time in the 2017/18 academic year. This roundtable presentation will open with a brief overview of the design process followed by the community and include progress reports from development community participants on their 2018/19 teaching experiences. We will conclude the session with reports from members of the Spring 2018 ePortfolio Development Community on their newly redesigned courses. Session participants will leave with examples of course-based portfolio assignments and resources for getting started on their own redesign adventures.


10:45 – 11:45 a.m. PRACTICAL APPROACHES TO USE CENTERED WEB DESIGN
Trula Fountaine & Lance Singbeil, IT Services LB322
Have you come across a website and just couldn’t find what you were looking for? Did you leave feeling unsatisfied and frustrated? You’re not alone and you’re experiencing a website that doesn’t have the best practices. Most educational websites suffer from a number of usability issues which largely impact its quality and performance. At Capilano University, this includes the main website, e-portfolios, and Moodle sites. In our presentation, we will talk about why it’s important and how it (or the lack of it) impacts student recruitment, retention, and educational experience. We will also provide easy and simple tweaks that you can use immediately to improve your website usability without having to know how to program.


1:30 – 3:45 p.m. CAPILANO U TO RANK AND TENURE: A PANEL DISCUSSION
Joanne Quirk, CFA and Lower Mainland faculty LB322
Is rank and tenure right for Capilano? A panel of faculty from Lower Mainland universities will discuss their experiences with transitioning to a rank and tenure system, followed by a Cap faculty discussion as this will be a bargaining issue.

Wednesday, May 9

9:30 – 10:30 a.m. TEACHING STRATEGIES 1: QUICK ACTIVE LEARNING IDEAS
Blake Rowsell, Mary Giovannetti & Annabella Cant LB322
Are you looking for a few strategies you can quickly and easily implement into your classes to make them a little more interactive? This session will start by providing you with five tools you can add to your toolbox. These tools can be added to any existing class to get your students more involved. Every strategy takes less than five minutes to set up, and less than five minutes of your class time.


9:30 – 10:30 a.m. PORTFOLIOS IN ACTION
Portfolio Project Team – Sudents and Faculty BR263
What does a student portfolio look like? What does a faculty portfolio look like? What does a course-based portfolio look like? What does a program-based portfolio look like? What does a combination of the above the look like? What motivates, excites, and inspires portfolio makers? And more. This session will feature presentations from Capilano students and faculty who embarked upon process of building out digital portfolios over the past year.


10:45 – 11:45 a.m. TEACHING STRATEGIES 2: COLLABORATIVE STUDENT ACTIVITIES
Derek Murray LB322
A demonstration of an activity that is a variation on the “jigsaw” collaborative learning technique. Students are first given a question to investigate. They work in a number of small groups to analyze a source document and draw evidence to answer the question. The groups are mixed so that there are new groups, each with an “expert” on one of the chosen documents. They can develop answers and teach each other. This works well in History, but can work in any discipline where students need to make an argument based on evidence from sources. We will discuss other collaborative activities that have worked well in your classrooms.


10:45 – 11:45 a.m. BYOB: BUILD YOUR OWN PORTFOLIO (WALKING THE TALK)
Auralea Mahood BR263
As more and more departments at Capilano University begin to incorporate portfolios into their courses and programs, so too may faculty be interested in modelling “folio thinking” for their students through the development and maintenance of their own personal websites. This two-part workshop begins by exploring models and rationales for professional portfolios in post-secondary with examples of sites developed by instructors from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds. The second half of the workshop is an hands-on introduction to the university’s WordPress multi-site and WordPress basics. Participants are asked to bring draft text (3-5 sentences) for an About Me/Bio page to the workshop.


1:30 – 2:30 pm Live Online Collaborative Learning, WebEx Part II
Bettina Boyle, Karen Yip, Angeline Han LB316
This session is relevant to any faculty member interested in exploring how they may use a tool such as WebEx in learning, teaching and communicating with students. We will explore effective live online teaching strategies, best practices and opportunities for collaborative learning via WebEx through discussion and examples of current WebEx uses by CapU faculty. While no prior experience is needed, some knowledge of WebEx would be helpful and attendance in “Introducing WebEx, (WebEx Part I)” is recommended. Participants can join in the session in-person or via WebEx from their own office.


1:30 – 2:30 p.m. PROGRAM ASSESSMENT 101
Caroline Depatie and Abigail Kinch LB322
Program assessment is the systematic collection, analysis and review of information undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning, experience and development. This process can help us develop a deep understanding of what students know, understand and can do with their knowledge as a result of their educational experiences. Developing and implementing a cyclical program assessment plan can provide a firm foundation to guide curricular and pedagogical planning. This interactive presentation will give participants an overview of the key components of the program assessment process. Participants will learn about setting program goals, developing measurable program learning outcomes, choosing assessment tools and how to combine various assessment methods to fit their program’s needs.


2:45 – 3:45 p.m. TEACHING STRATEGIES 3: Liberating Structures Active Learning Ideas
Laura Mackay LB322
Liberating Structures are are a set of powerful facilitation tools designed to purposively organize group interactions to foster participation, collaboration, inclusivity, and creativity in meetings, teaching, and workshops.  They liberate potential, leverage collective wisdom and spark creativity. In this intro to Liberating Structures, participants will learn how to use Wicked Questions, Triz, 25-10 Crowdsourcing and more!


2:45 – 3:45 p.m. STEPS TO CURRICULUM MAPPING
Derek Murray and Susan Romeo-Gilbert LB306
Curriculum mapping is a method for delineating how individual courses within a program combine in order to scaffold students’ achievement of the expected program level outcomes across courses. This process can be useful for identifying gaps or redundancies in a curriculum, identifying courses which are disconnected from a program, highlighting how required courses may be over or under-utilized, drawing attention to missed opportunities for utilizing pre-requisites and refining program outcome statements. Curriculum maps can be used to articulate where, when and how students arrive at the learning outcomes of a program. This interactive presentation will guide participants through each step of the process of developing a curriculum map using examples and discussion. This session will be especially helpful for anyone involved in program development, program assessment and/or program review.

Thursday, May 10

9:30 – 10:30 a.m. PRESIDENT’S WELCOME: CAPILANO CELEBRATION LIGHTNING TALKS LB322
2017 Teaching Award faculty: Barb Mathieson, Eugene Chu, Greig Gjerdalen, Karen Okun, Steven Atkins and other Capilano faculty share teaching tips.


10:45 – 11:45 a.m. TEACHING IN THE OPEN: CREATING AUTHENTIC ASSIGNMENTS IN THE CLASSROOM
Lucas Wright & Krista Lambert, BCCampus LB322
Teaching in the open is a way to engage learners with the wider ­community, give them authentic practice and move beyond “disposable assignments.” Open teaching ranges from students creating learning objects to share with future classes and the public (using various media), to students editing and creating articles for Wikipedia. These rich learning experiences can offer faculty, students and staff new ways of approaching their teaching and learning and offer a different way of conceptualizing the role of the learner in the production of knowledge. Join BC Campus staff making a repeat visit to Capilano University. Open textbooks used by many instructors across BC will be available to take a look at.


1:30 – 2:30 p.m. ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS ON TEACHING AND LEARNING TOPICS
(20 Minutes each – join one or all!)
LB322

Janet Waters: Strategies to Lure Students Away from Off-Task Texting and Laptopping in Class
Students in our classes or studying must deal with distractions from their mobile devices – texting and off task use of social media – and these distractions lead to lower grades. Although they tend to believe they can multitask, in fact they can’t actually process and respond to the text and the lecture simultaneously, or put the instructor on pause, so rather than multitasking, they are task-switching. This causes significant failures in their perception, attention, memory, understanding of the lecture material, and ultimately their grades. Experimental and observational studies over the last few years found that students on their laptop during class spend only 1/3 of their time on class-relevant activities such as note-taking – the other 2/3 of the time they are Facebooking, surfing the net, emailing or gaming. This distracts them and even more, distracts the students around them (and their instructors). In one study the laptop-using students’ grades went from a C to a D. And the grades of the students around them? From a B to a D. Tech distractions may be the most urgent classroom issue in post-secondary education today. We need effective strategies to help our students resist the compelling allure of their tech. Our roundtable discussion will share what we (and research) have found works and doesn’t work in the classroom to keep students engaged and learning what we have to teach. 

Jorge Oceguera: Neuroscience and education: what we know so far
For more than a decade, significant efforts have been made to establish a productive and effective dialogue between neuroscience and education. Findings from each field can inform practice and hopefully improve learning. Translating scientific research is imperative as the brain is the ‘organ of learning’ and the intersection between neuroscience and education promises advances in our understanding of how we learn. Join a new scholar in the field and find out what Educational Neuroscience tells us so far.

Ferdos Jamali: Research into writing in an ESL setting: lived experiences of first-year international students
Writing in a second language setting is always a challenging skill to master. Part of the challenge is that the norms of writing and evaluation in a foreign language context are considerably different from those governing a second language setting. This comes as a shock to many international students who specifically come from countries which have vast sociocultural differences from a western culture. This study is a longitudinal one which has followed a number of international students in an advanced EAP program over the course of a semester and reflects their lived experiences of being in an academic ESL setting. Although one semester seems like a very short time to see any noticeable changes in the writing skills, the study demonstrates that the majority of students feel perceptible change of various nature, culminating in developing critical thinking skills which is a landmark of a (western-style) academic context.

Nancy Nowlan: Guidelines for online course design – should we have some?
Many academic programs implement specific basic guidelines for their online learning programs following good pedagogy practice such as creating an introductory instructor video to engage students with a personal connection. We will share different institutional policies and faculty can recommend what, if any, guidelines Capilano faculty should be following in new online course design.

Mary Giovannetti and Annabel Cant: Reimagining final exams
There are many ways to assess your students learning. Come for a discussion of a creative assessment practices and alternatives to final exams.


2:45 – 3:45 p.m. Maker Lab Visit Cyri Jones Zen Maker Lab, 272 1st E, North Vancouver
As more and more departments at Capilano University begin to incorporate portfolios into their courses and programs, so too may faculty be interested in modelling “folio thinking” for their students through the development and maintenance of their own personal websites. This two-part workshop begins by exploring models and rationales for professional portfolios in post-secondary with examples of sites developed by instructors from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds. The second half of the workshop is an hands-on introduction to the university’s WordPress multi-site and WordPress basics. Participants are asked to bring draft text (3-5 sentences) for an About Me/Bio page to the workshop.


4:30 p.m. CAPpy Hour
Finch and Barley, 250 1st St. E, North Vancouver
Come enjoy Mediterranean appetizers and visit with your colleagues as we take over the beautiful FInch and Barley in Lower Lonsdale for an hour (Right next door to the Maker Lab). Door prizes!

Friday, May 11

9:00 – 12:00 p.m. Go Outdoors! Old growth Forest Interpretive Walk in the LSCR
Roy Janzten Field Trip
Spring is a stunning time to visit the old growth forest in the upper Seymour Valley. Join Roy Jantzen, naturalist and Tourism and Outdoor Recreation faculty on an interpretive walk in this Temperate Forest. Learn about the plants and animals of this temperate forest and their interconnections that make up the biodiversity of this ecologically rich area. Weather permitting, lunch will be out on the edge of the Seymour River. Maximum 20 people. A bus will depart from the Sportsplex for this session.


9:30 – 11:45 a.m. Plan a Successful Event: Tips and Tools for You and for Your Students
Jacqueline Clarke LB186
Planning successful events: if you plan events for your faculty (recruitment activities, career fair, information night, student engagement activity, etc.) OR students plan events as part of an assignment for your class, this session will provide tips, tools and ideas you can use to ensure your events are successful and for coaching your students to be successful with their projects.

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